Bacteria that cause leprosy can help us to stop aging and prevent liver related diseases, research revealed

highlights

  • Reported for the first time in the year 2013

  • Liver reprogramming can help

Bacteria are often linked to disease. However, there are some good bacteria too, which help us in fighting other diseases. Now, in the same way leprosy means the bacteria that cause leprosy can also be useful to end your disease. The bacteria that cause leprosy can help reprogram liver cells. Let us tell you that these cells can help in preventing aging or in developing the treatment of liver disease.

What came to the fore in the research?

Let us tell you, leprosy is caused by a slow-growing bacteria called Mycobacterium leprae (M. leprae), which can infect nerves, skin, eyes and nose. Due to this, there are wounds and knots in the person’s body. Anura Rambukkana and colleagues at the University of Edinburgh in the UK have discovered that M. leprae grows through host tissue. This is called “biological alchemy” in the language of science.

Reported for the first time in the year 2013

It was reported for the first time in the year 2013. It was found that M. leprae hijacks the genes of the Schwann cell. It forms a fatty substance that insulates nerve fibers. The bacteria reactivate the developmental gene, causing the Schwann cells to revert to a migratory, stem cell-like state and move around the body, enabling the bacteria to infect more cells.

Liver reprogramming can help

But now in recent research it has been found that M. leprae can reprogram liver cells in the same way. “The leprosy bacteria can cause liver tissue at the organ level to develop therapies that can help us reprogram the entire liver,” says Rambukkana.

“This could help us understand how to safely activate liver re-program and development,” says Luca Urbani, from the Roger Williams Institute of Hepatology in London.

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